MLA

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Multi-Link Adapter (for 1600SW)

MLA.back.jpg

Opening a MLA from packaging:


SGI Product description on MLAs

SGI FAQs on MLAs:

Post on replacing capacitors http://forums.nekochan.net/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=16725932 The MLA I bought was generating hissing noise from one of capacitors, and I saw distortion lines on the screen, replacing capacitors solved both issues.

Repair

Reporting full success, the capacitors are: Sanyo OS-CON 6SVP220M and 16SVP100M, I had no trouble ordering perfectly matching ones from http://www.logic-d.net/ (Japanese), it cost me some 147 and 273 JPY respectively a piece (ordered 3 of each just in case). Datasheets (in Japanese) are here: http://www.edc.sanyo.com/pdf/oscon/J32_33.pdf (the form factor matching the ones from MLA is F8).

Replaced them just now and the monitor works flawlessly, no hissing noise, and no noise lines in the picture either.

Looking at the board closely, it seems it may be possible to mod the MLA to accept ordinary 5V (with enough current) and simply get rid of all those capacitors, voltage regulators etc. I'm pretty sure there's no special reason for those other than being able to use the same power supply as in 1600SW...

It also makes me wonder what is the second power socket for - it's not soldered anywhere, but I checked and the respective pins are short with the same pins in the working one... (for a moment I thought that may have been direct 5V input - but it doesn't seem so).

One important point - my cheapo (sparkfun) 30W soldering iron was not really able to melt the existing solder - it's very likely SGI used lead-free solder with some relatively high melting point (could be even 20C above ordinary). So even though my soldering works I will need to resolder them again with better iron to ensure good contact (I have Weller stashed somewhere in my office so this won't take long). Also, the original capacitors are soldered ALL THE WAY along the contact pins (underneath too), so depending on your iron you may simply end up ripping part of it away from the board - and with an ordinary soldering method you will not be able to resolder it in exact same way (unless you have SMD kit).. The original capacitors have this little (red in my case) glue which holds them during manufacturing process - this one can be scraped off easily with any sharp object, you don't really need to apply any new glue, but it is helpful if the capacitor doesn't move while you solder



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