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When you use the Window Manager to place a window on the screen, you specify the location of its port rectangle in global coordinates. However, within the port rectangle, the drawing area is described using a local coordinate system. You draw into a window in local coordinates, without regard to the window's location on the screen.
 
When you use the Window Manager to place a window on the screen, you specify the location of its port rectangle in global coordinates. However, within the port rectangle, the drawing area is described using a local coordinate system. You draw into a window in local coordinates, without regard to the window's location on the screen.
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=Colors=
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The earliest Macintosh models all used basic QuickDraw to draw to built-in screens with known characteristics. The [[Macintosh II]] computer introduced [[Color QuickDraw]], which supports a variety of screens of differing sizes and color capabilities. With [[Color QuickDraw]], users can choose from a wide range of screen options, from simple 12-inch black-and-white screens to full-page grayscale monitors to large two-page displays capable of presenting millions of colors. Users can even connect two or more separate screens to the same computer and simultaneously view different portions of the system's global coordinate plane.
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A pixel, which is short for picture element, is the smallest dot that QuickDraw can draw. On a black-and-white monitor, a pixel is a single-color phosphor dot that displays in two states--black and white. On a color screen, three phosphor dots (red, green, and blue) compose each color pixel.
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A pair of fields in a graphics port, fgColor and bkColor, specify a foreground and background color. The foreground color is the color used for bit patterns and for the graphics pen when drawing. By default, the foreground color is black. The background color is the color of the pixels in the bitmap or pixel map wherever no drawing has taken place. By default, the background color is white. However, when there is a color screen your application can draw with a color other than black by changing the foreground color, and your application can draw into a background other than white by changing the background color. For example, by changing the foreground color to red and the background color to blue before drawing a rectangle, your application can draw a red rectangle against a blue background.
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On a color screen, you can draw in color even when you are using a basic graphics port. Although basic QuickDraw graphics routines were designed for black-and-white drawing, they also support an eight-color system that basic QuickDraw predefines for display on color screens and color printers. Because [[Color QuickDraw]] also supports this eight-color system, it is compatible across all Macintosh platforms.
    
=See Also=
 
=See Also=

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