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[[File:Pippin-Atmark-Console-Set.jpg|thumb]]
 
[[File:Pippin-Atmark-Console-Set.jpg|thumb]]
 
[[File:Bandia-Pippin-pcb.jpg|thumb]]
 
[[File:Bandia-Pippin-pcb.jpg|thumb]]
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[[File:Pippinlogo2.gif|right]]
    
Pippin is a set of technologies designed by [[Apple Computer]] for Bandai Digital Entertainment Corporation in Japan. Pippin lets you run specially-modified Macintosh CD-ROMs on a low-cost player that plugs into a standard television set. Runs on a [[PowerPC 603]] processor.
 
Pippin is a set of technologies designed by [[Apple Computer]] for Bandai Digital Entertainment Corporation in Japan. Pippin lets you run specially-modified Macintosh CD-ROMs on a low-cost player that plugs into a standard television set. Runs on a [[PowerPC 603]] processor.
    
=Technical Specifications=
 
=Technical Specifications=
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[[File:Technote.gif|right]]
 
===Hardware===
 
===Hardware===
 
* 66MHz [[PowerPC 603]] [[RISC]] microprocessor
 
* 66MHz [[PowerPC 603]] [[RISC]] microprocessor
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* Pippin System Software upgrades released through CD-ROM stamping operations
 
* Pippin System Software upgrades released through CD-ROM stamping operations
 
* 68k emulator
 
* 68k emulator
* [[Macintosh Toolbox]] intact  
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* [[Macintosh Toolbox]] intact
    
=Pippin Technical Notes=
 
=Pippin Technical Notes=
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==PippinFinder==
 
==PippinFinder==
 
The PippinFinder file is only to be used with CDs that have a multiple-application interface. Since most titles developed for Pippin will involve only a single application launched immediately at start-up, the PippinFinder file is not used and therefore should not be placed in the System Folder. Even with multiple application titles, the PippinFinder does not provide the interface for launching the applications within a title CD; the interface is provided by a Pippin Launch file.
 
The PippinFinder file is only to be used with CDs that have a multiple-application interface. Since most titles developed for Pippin will involve only a single application launched immediately at start-up, the PippinFinder file is not used and therefore should not be placed in the System Folder. Even with multiple application titles, the PippinFinder does not provide the interface for launching the applications within a title CD; the interface is provided by a Pippin Launch file.
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The PippinFinder file, when used with multiple-application titles, is used to search and find the Pippin Launch file. The Pippin Launch file contains a resource of type PCde with an ID of zero. When launching, the PCde code resource is loaded and executed, and thus provides an interface for multiple application selection.
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The API for the Pippin Launch code module is as follows:
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    pascal OSErr PippinCode(FSSpecPtr fileToLaunch, Boolean* restart);
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The PippinCode module works in that when it is called, it expects to returned an FSSpec in the FSSpecPtr. Another varred parameter, called shutdown is used to let PippinFinder know that the code module, as requested by the user, wants to restart the machine.
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With version 1.0 of PippinFinder, a return of any error will result in PippinFinder hanging in an endless loop. By returning an invalid FSSpec will also result in PippinFinder hanging in the same loop. It is therefore vital that the code module does adequate error checking.
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To help limit memory leaks before the code module is called, a heap of 2Meg is created in temporary memory space and a zone is initialized there. If you need more memory, use additional temporary memory space. When returned from the PippinCode module, the handle which contains the 2Meg code module is released.
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This describes the total functionality of PippinFinder. Apple is also providing a PippinCode module that will be described in a separate Pippin Technical Note. For functionality beyond what Apple's PippinCode provides, developers are directed to write their own PCde code modules.
    
==Stopping INIT Icons==
 
==Stopping INIT Icons==
 
The Pippin OS frequently includes extensions such as QuickTime and Applejack. Extensions almost always draw an icon when loading, which is what produces the row of icons across the bottom of the screen when the system is booting. The Pippin user experience though should not include such computer specific messages. The user probably will not even know what QuickTime is. Therefore, developers should stop the drawing of icons during the boot process for Pippin CDs.
 
The Pippin OS frequently includes extensions such as QuickTime and Applejack. Extensions almost always draw an icon when loading, which is what produces the row of icons across the bottom of the screen when the system is booting. The Pippin user experience though should not include such computer specific messages. The user probably will not even know what QuickTime is. Therefore, developers should stop the drawing of icons during the boot process for Pippin CDs.
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Stopping an icon from drawing on the screen at boot time is relatively easy. Just erase its mask with ResEdit and QuickDraw won't draw it. This procedure shows how to prevent QuickTime from drawing its icon but the process is the same for all extensions.
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[[File:Figure11.gif]]
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[[File:Figure22.gif]]
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Note: A few extensions draw 'cicn's rather than the 'ICN#' resources shown here. The rule is: Open the icon that is drawn at boot time. You will just have to try this, and if the icon stil shows up, look for another icon that you may have missed.
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Click on the mask, then use the eraser tool to erase the entire mask. Finally, close and save the extension.
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[[File:Figure33.gif]]
    
==Creating Pippin CD-ROMs==
 
==Creating Pippin CD-ROMs==
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===Introduction===
 
All CD-ROM titles to be played on Pippin Power Players must be "Pippinized" in order to successfully run on a Pippin. This technical note describes the hardware, software, and procedures required to make Pippin-ready CD-ROMs though either modification of already released CD-ROM titles, or in initializing a brand new CD-ROM title.
 
All CD-ROM titles to be played on Pippin Power Players must be "Pippinized" in order to successfully run on a Pippin. This technical note describes the hardware, software, and procedures required to make Pippin-ready CD-ROMs though either modification of already released CD-ROM titles, or in initializing a brand new CD-ROM title.
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===Required Equipment===
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Ensure that all required equipment, either hardware or software, is readily at hand before beginning the CD-ROM "pippinizing" processes. Do not begin these procedures if you do not have all equipment immediately available.
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====Hardware====
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The following hardware is required to complete these procedures:
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* Power Macintosh 6100/66 or higher. AV Power Macintosh models are optional.
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* external hard drive with a minimum of 200MB
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* CD-ROM duplicating device (e.g., Yamaha CDR-100 or any other duplicating device). 4x speed duplicating device models are recommended, although lower speed devices will work as well.
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* SCSI/SCSI connectors short extender cable
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* SCSI/SCSI-2 connectors short extender cable
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* SCSI connector terminator
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* SCSI-2 connector terminator
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* Pippin Power Player testing unit with external SCSI connector cable
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* Applejack controller
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* TV monitor
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* Blank CD-R disks (preferably gold dye type)
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The following hardware is optionally required to complete these procedures:
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* keyboard and adapter cable
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* external memory card, if needed for development.
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* AV cable +/- S-video cable
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* modem
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* printer
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* network cables or other necessary networking hardware
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====Software====
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Ensure that the following software is readily available before beginning this procedure.
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Note: All software versions listed are minimum levels; higher levels are also acceptable.
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* System 7.5.1 (or higher) must be installed on the Power Macintosh.
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* CD-ROM drivers are packaged with System 7.5.1. Specifically, the following extensions must be present on the Power Macintosh before beginning this procedure:
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** Apple CD-ROM
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** Apple Photo Access
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** Audio CD Access
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** Foreign File Access
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** High Sierra File Access
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** ISO 9660 File Access
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Note: In general, it is best to have the latest CD-ROM drivers installed on your Power Macintosh. If using System 7.5.1, install Update 5.1.1. If using System 7.5.2 or later, Update 5.1.1 is not necessary.
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Note: If using enhanced multimedia CD formats, ensure that you have the appropriate additional CD driver extensions installed.
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* CD-ROM duplicating software, such as Toast CD-ROM Pro(TM) 2.5.6.
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* SCSIProbe 3.5 (shareware) or any other volume mounting utility.
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* ResEdit 2.1.3 or any other resource editing application.
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* Hard Disk formatting application, such as Hard Disk Tool Kit(TM) 1.75 by FWB or APS PowerTools(TM) 2.8.1.
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* Pippin System Folder (available from Pippin SDK).
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* Demo or application software to be installed.
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* Authentication software, if necessary. (See "Authentication" Technical Notes.)
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* AppleJack 2.2.0 application and system extension if customizing the Applejack Controller (available from Pippin SDK). (See "Applejack Input Device Driver" Technical Notes).
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===Setting Up===
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The following subsections provide a step-by-step procedure to make "Pippin-ready" CD-ROMs.
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Note: Do not skip steps! Work carefully to ensure that the specified procedure is properly implemented.
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====Hardware Configuration====
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Configure the Power Macintosh, external hard drive, and CD-ROM duplicating device as follows:
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# Set SCSI ID on the external hard drive to an unused value other than existing SCSI IDs (i.e., typically, a Power Macintosh's internal hard drive has a SCSI ID set to "0"; the internal CD-ROM is usually set to "3"; the CD-ROM duplicating device can be set to "1").
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# Using the SCSI/SCSI cable, attach one end to the back of the Power Macintosh; attach the other end to the external hard drive's SCSI connector.
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# Using the SCSI/SCSI-2 cable, attach the SCSI end of the cable to the remaining SCSI connector on the external hard drive; attach the SCSI-2 end of the cable to the CD-ROM duplicating device.
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# Place the SCSI-2 terminator on the open SCSI-2 connector on the CD-ROM duplicating device.
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[[File:Figure111.gif]]
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====Preparing External Hard Drive====
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The external hard drive must be formatted or partitioned before beginning the "Pippinizing" procedure. Ensure that the following steps are carefully carried out. Do not skip any steps.
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# Using SCSI Probe 3.5 (or higher) control panel, mount the external hard drive (i.e., first select "Update", then "Mount" to mount the external drive).
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# Using Hard Disk Toolkit 1.75 (or higher), select the external hard drive ID from the listed SCSI IDs.
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# Select "Format" to format the selected hard drive. When the application queries what type of partition is desired, select "Standard Partition" and highlight "Maximum Macintosh".
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# Partition size should not be greater than 640MB, since writable CD-ROMs are that same size. Ideally, create a partition that is CD-ROM size.
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===Creating a "Pippin-Ready" CD-ROM===
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Follow the appropriate process in the following sections to create a "Pippin-ready" CD-ROM:
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* To modify an already released CD-ROM, follow the procedure in section 4.1.
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* To create a brand new "Pippin-ready" CD-ROM, skip to section 4.2, "Creating a New Pippin CD-ROM," on page 8.
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====Modifying a Released CD-ROM Title====
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Before beginning this procedure, ensure that all configuration steps as outlined in section 3, "Setting Up," have been completed. You cannot proceed with this procedure if any steps in section 3 and its subsections have been skipped.
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1. Insert released CD-ROM in Power Macintosh CD drive.
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2. Drag and drop the entire volume of CD-ROM title to newly formatted partition on the external hard drive.
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Note: Do not use "Select All" to copy volume because hidden files could potentially be left behind in the copy process. By dragging and dropping, you are ensured that all files/folders and/or paths within the volume are duplicated to the partition.
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3. Using ResEdit 2.1.3 (or higher), find any hidden files or folders within the copied volume, and make them visible on the external hard drive.
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4. Rename the volume folder of the recently copied volume (in the partition) by adding "old" to the end of the volume name.
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5. Press "Select All" files within the volume folder of the recently copied volume (in the partition).
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6. Drag and drop all selected files to the "root level" of the partition (on external hard drive).
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7. Rename the partition to the same title name as the original volume name.
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8. Launch the title to test that the copy process was successful.
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Note: Sometimes titles are developed with specific requirements of using a hard drive to launch. In such cases, use a utility such as DiskLocker 1.3 to lock your hard drive before testing the title. Launch the application from the "locked" hard drive partition. If the application still does not launch properly, you may want to recheck the development work of the title. Once the testing is successful, remember to "unlock" the hard drive before preceding.
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9. Drag and drop old empty volume folder to the Trash.
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10. Drag and drop Pippin System Folder into the title volume partition (available from Pippin SDK).
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11. Ensure that the following minimum file set exists in the Pippin System Folder
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[[File:Figure222.gif]]
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Note: Although the Finder file is included in Figure 2, the Finder is not included in the license and should not be released with the Pippin end-product. Refer to sections 4.3.1 through 4.3.3 to see how and when to properly remove the Finder from your Pippin CD-ROM.
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12. If any additional software, preferences, and/or extensions are needed to run the title (e.g., networking software, modem software, Applejack application and system extension, ADB device software, Pippin Launch, etc.), add them to the title volume partition at this time.
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Note: If additional software needs to be installed with an Installer file, be sure to install the software onto the Pippin, and not the Power Macintosh, or else the System Folder components will not get installed.
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13. Ensure that the Pippin System Folder is called "System Folder".
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14. Create a new folder in the System Folder called "temp".
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15. Drag and drop the PippinFinder file into the temp folder.
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16. Unmount and shut down the external hard drive.
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17. Attach the external hard drive to the Pippin test unit by connecting the available external SCSI cable to the hard drive.
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18. Attach an Applejack controller to the Pippin test unit, or, optionally, attach a keyboard adapter and keyboard to the Pippin test unit.
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19. Place a SCSI terminator on the extra SCSI connector slot on the external hard drive, if necessary.
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20. Boot the hard drive with the Pippin test unit connected.
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Note: If having difficulty booting the hard drive, restart the drive after adding a SCSI terminator.
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21. Configure the title to run on the Pippin with the final Pippin configuration.
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22. Launch the title on the Pippin to test all title capabilities. Expanded memory should not be used during testing of the title capabilities, and memory allocations should be efficiently used and kept to a minimum.
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23. Test thoroughly.
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Note: Do not skip the final testing step. Test all title capabilities. At this stage of the process especially, it is crucial to determine whether the title is going to work on a Pippin, or not. If the title does not work, then the developer must figure out why and how to make the title work before proceeding with this process.
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24. Upon successful thorough testing, continue with "Front-End Interface Configuration".
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====Creating a New Pippin CD-ROM====
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Before beginning this procedure, ensure that all configuration steps as outlined in section 3, "Setting Up," have been completed. You cannot proceed with this procedure if any steps in section 3 and its subsections have been skipped.
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1. Drag and drop all new title files from wherever they have been stored on the Power Macintosh to the "root level" of the newly formatted partition on the external hard drive.
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2. Ensure that any hidden files have also been copied (use ResEdit 2.1.3 (or higher) in needed).
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3. Rename the partition to coincide with the title name.
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4. Launch the title to test that the copy process was successful.
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Note: Sometimes titles are developed with specific requirements of using a hard drive to launch. In such cases, use a utility such as DiskLocker(TM) 1.3 to lock your hard drive before testing the title. Launch the application from the "locked" hard drive partition. If the application still does not launch properly, you may want to recheck the development work of the title. Once the testing is successful, remember to "unlock" the hard drive before preceding.
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5. Drag and drop the Pippin System Folder into the title volume partition (available from Pippin SDK).
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6. Ensure that the minimum file set shown in Figure 1 on page 4 exists in the Pippin System Folder (if not, contact Pippin development at [email protected]).
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Note: Although the Finder file is included in Figure 2, the Finder is not included in the license and should not be released with the Pippin end-product.
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7. If any additional software, preferences, and/or extensions are needed to run the title (e.g., networking software, modem software, Applejack system extension and application, ADB device software, Pippin Launch, etc.), add them to the title volume partition at this time.
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Note: If additional software needs to be installed with an "Installer" file, be sure to install the software onto the Pippin, and not the Power Macintosh, or else the System Folder components will not get installed.
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8. Ensure that the Pippin System Folder is called "System Folder".
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9. Create new folder in the System Folder called "temp".
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10. Drag and drop the PippinFinder file into the temp folder.
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11. Unmount and shut down the external hard drive.
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12. Attach the external hard drive to the Pippin test unit by connecting the available external SCSI cable to the hard drive.
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13. Attach an Applejack controller to the Pippin test unit, or, optionally, attach a keyboard adapter and keyboard to the Pippin test unit.
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14. Place a SCSI terminator on the extra SCSI connector slot on the external hard drive, if necessary.
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15. Boot the hard drive with the Pippin test unit connected.
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Note: If having difficulty booting the hard drive, restart the drive after adding a SCSI terminator.
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16. Configure the title to run on the Pippin with the final Pippin configuration.
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17. Launch the title on the Pippin to test all title capabilities. Expanded memory should not be used during testing of the title capabilities, and memory allocations should be efficiently used and kept to a minimum.
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18. Test thoroughly.
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Note: Do not skip the final testing step. Test all title capabilities. At this stage of the process especially, it is crucial to determine whether the title is going to work on a Pippin, or not. If the title does not work, then the developer must figure out why and how to make the title work before proceeding with this process.
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====Front-End Interface Configuration====
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Since there are many ways to configure a title's front-end interface, deciding on a strategy of how a developer wants the title to be launched is very important. The following subsections outline just three ways to configure titles' launching mechanisms. Of course, many other customized mechanisms will be attempted and are possible by engineers. However, a key point to note is that what works for one title will not always work for another title since each and every title is unique, and has very different requirements.
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Use one of the following described interface configuration mechanism that best suits your title's needs, or design your own, with the understanding that such a chore may be far more time-consuming than may first seem to be.
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Note: If you are unsure about which interface option to use, simply choose one and attempt it. If the final launch test fails, select an alternative option. If you exhaust all options, contact Pippin development at [email protected] with a description of your processes and problem.
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=====Option: Launching Title with an "Alias" of Title=====
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By using this interface configuration mechanism successfully, the title application will launch automatically upon inserting the CD-ROM title into the Pippin test unit.
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Note: Some titles will not allow an "alias" to launch the title, thus requiring the developer to select another option.
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1. Make an "alias" (press \xf0 m) of the title application file (located in the volume title partition of the external hard drive).
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2. Drag and drop the alias file to the Startup Items folder within the System Folder.
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3. Drag and drop the (Macintosh) Finder file and the temp folder to the Trash.
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4. Rename the PippinFinder file to "Finder".
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5. Open the new renamed Finder with ResEdit.
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6. Under "File" in the Menu bar, select "Get Info for Finder", and a window similar to Figure 3 will appear.
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Figure 3 : "Info for Finder" Window BEFORE Changes Are Made
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[[File:Figure333.gif]]
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7. Change Type from "APPL" to "FNDR" and Creator from "pfdr" to "MACS". Also, under "Finder flags", deselect "Has BNDL" and "Use Custom Icon", as shown in Figure 4.
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Figure 4 : "Info for Finder" Window AFTER Changes Are Made
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[[File:Figure44.gif]]
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8. Close and save the new Finder file.
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9. If any additional software, preferences, and/or extensions are needed to run the title (e.g., networking software, modem software, Applejack system extension and application, ADB device software, Pippin Launch, etc.), configure them at this time.
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10. Configure hardware as desired (e.g., customizing Applejack controller, ADB devices, etc.).
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11. Reboot the Pippin to test whether the title is automatically launched.
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12. If the title launches upon reboot, retest all title capabilities. (If the title will not launch, proceed with another interface configuring option.)
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13. Test thoroughly.
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Note: Do not skip the final testing step. Test all title capabilities.
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14. Upon successful thorough testing, continue with section 5, "Final Steps: Pressing the Newly Pippinized CD-ROM," on page 15.
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=====Option 2: Launching Title with Application in "Startup Items"=====
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By using this interface configuration mechanism successfully, the title application will automatically be launched upon inserting the CD-ROM title into the Pippin test unit.
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Note: Some titles will not allow the application file to launch from a location other than the "root" on the volume; thus requiring the developer to select another option.
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1. Drag and drop the title application file to the Startup Items folder within the System Folder.
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Note: This mechanism will not work if your title requires other components to also be in the Startup Items folder within the System Folder.
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2. Drag and drop the PippinFinder file from the temp folder to the System Folder.
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3. Drag and drop the (Macintosh) Finder file and the temp folder to the Trash.
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4. Rename the PippinFinder file to "Finder".
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5. Open the new renamed Finder with ResEdit.
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6. Under "File" in the Menu bar, select "Get Info for Finder", and a window similar to Figure 5 will appear.
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Figure 5 : "Info for Finder" Window BEFORE Changes Are Made
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[[File:Figure333.gif]]
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7. Change Type from "APPL" to "FNDR" and Creator from "pfdr" to "MACS". Also, under "Finder flags", deselect "Has BNDL" and "Use Custom Icon", as shown in Figure 6. Figure 6 : "Info for Finder" Window AFTER Changes Are Made
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[[File:Figure44.gif]]
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8. Close and save the new Finder file.
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9. If any additional software, preferences, and/or extensions are needed to run the title (e.g., networking software, modem software, Applejack system extension and application, ADB device software, Pippin Launch, etc.), configure them at this time.
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10. Configure hardware as desired (e.g., customizing Applejack controller, ADB devices, etc.).
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11. Reboot the Pippin to test whether the title is automatically launched.
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12. If the title launches upon reboot, retest all title capabilities. (If the title will not launch, proceed with another interface configuring option.)
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13. Test thoroughly.
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Note: Do not skip the final testing step. Test all title capabilities.
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14. Upon successful thorough testing, continue with "Final Steps: Pressing the Newly Pippinized CD-ROM".
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=====Option 3: Pippin Launch=====
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By using this interface configuration mechanism successfully, a custom user interface is modified according to the requirements of the title.
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1. Reconnect the external hard drive to the Power Macintosh following the steps defined in "Hardware Configuration".
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2. Drag and drop the Pippin Launch file to the System Folder (available from Pippin SDK).
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3. Drag and drop the PippinFinder file from the temp folder to the System Folder.
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4. Drag and drop the (Macintosh) Finder file and the temp folder to the Trash.
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5. Duplicate the PippinFinder file (press \xf0 d).
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6. Rename the PippinFinder copy file to "Finder".
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7. Open the new renamed Finder with ResEdit.
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8. Under "File" in the Menu bar, select "Get Info for Finder", and a window similar to Figure 7 will appear.
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Figure 7 : "Info for Finder" Window BEFORE Changes Are Made
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[[File:Figure333.gif]]
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9. Change Type from "APPL" to "FNDR" and Creator from "pfdr" to "MACS". Also, under "Finder flags", deselect "Has BNDL" and "Use Custom Icon", as shown in Figure 8.
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Figure 8 : "Info for Finder" Window AFTER Changes Are Made
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[[File:Figure44.gif]]
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10. Close and save the new Finder file.
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11. If any additional software, preferences, and/or extensions are needed to run the title (e.g., networking software, modem software, Applejack system extension and application, ADB device software, Pippin Launch, etc.), configure them at this time.
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12. Configure hardware as desired (e.g., customizing Applejack controller, ADB devices, etc.).
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13. Double-click on Pippin Launch file.
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14. Use ResEdit 2.1.3 to configure Pippin Launch as desired. (See "Pippin Launch" Technical Note)
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15. Launch the title on the Pippin to test all title capabilities.
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16. Test thoroughly.
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Note: Do not skip the final testing step. Test all title capabilities.
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===Final Steps: Pressing the Newly Pippinized CD-ROM===
 +
Assuming that all steps in proceeding sections have been properly followed, you may begin the final steps: the pressing of the newly Pippinized CD-ROM.
 +
 +
1. Inactivate AppleTalk on the Power Macintosh.
 +
 +
2. Disable networking on the Power Macintosh (i.e., LocalTalk should be selected).
 +
 +
Note: Disabling networking connections is crucial to do before continuing this procedure. Networking interruptions will interfere with the CD-ROM mastering process.
 +
 +
3. Reconnect the external hard drive to the Power Macintosh following the steps defined in "Hardware Configuration".
 +
 +
4. Insert a blank, unused, unpressed gold dye type CD-R disk into the duplicating device.
 +
 +
5. Launch Toast CD-ROM Pro 2.5.6 (or higher).
 +
 +
6. Ensure that "Macintosh HFS CD-ROM" (or "Mac Volume" for higher versions of Toast CD-ROM Pro) is displayed in the Toast application window. If not, select "Macintosh HFS CD-ROM" from the "Format" menu.
 +
 +
7. Click on the "Data..." button.
 +
 +
8. Select title volume from the displayed list of volumes.
 +
 +
9. Ensure that the "Bootable" option is tagged on the bottom of the displayed window.
 +
 +
10. Ensure that both CD writer and CD is tagged for synchronized speed from the "Recorder" menu and specifies either 4x or 2x, depending on the CD-ROM duplicating device.
 +
 +
11. Click on the "Search..." button to ensure that the Power Macintosh is seeing the CD-ROM duplicating device. (If not seen, double check all SCSI connections.)
 +
 +
12. Click on the "Write CD..." button to write to the blank CD-ROM.
 +
 +
13. Click on the "Write Disk..." button from within the next window.
 +
 +
14. The CD-ROM pressing begins. The time to press a CD-ROM varies anywhere from 2 to 60 minutes or more (largely dependent on the speed of the CD-ROM duplicating device).
 +
 +
15. Using the newly pressed CD-ROM, conduct a final test on the Pippin testing unit using the new CD-ROM to launch the title.
 +
 +
16. Test thoroughly.
 +
 +
Note: Do not skip the final testing step. Test all title capabilities. If errors are found, redo the process and press another CD-ROM.
    
==Flash Access==
 
==Flash Access==
 
The Flash Access chip is a writable FlashROM chip with a 120K maximum capacity located on the Pippin main logic board. Since the Pippin does not have a hard drive to store information, and external storage devices cannot be assumed to always be present, a developer has very limited space to work with. Developers must therefore recognize the storage limitations of the Flash Access chip, and plan their titles accordingly.
 
The Flash Access chip is a writable FlashROM chip with a 120K maximum capacity located on the Pippin main logic board. Since the Pippin does not have a hard drive to store information, and external storage devices cannot be assumed to always be present, a developer has very limited space to work with. Developers must therefore recognize the storage limitations of the Flash Access chip, and plan their titles accordingly.
 +
 +
Flash storage will appear to a developer just like a standard Macintosh volume. To work within the limitations of this chip, title developers are encouraged to keep their "save game" options and memory storage requirements to a minimum. All design considerations and/or enhancements should be made with storage requirements clearly planned for.
 +
 +
If within the design of a title, users are encouraged to keep their storage space clean, performance problems with storage will be kept to a minimum. If users are provided with these guidelines up front, many users will have little difficulty playing within this limited space. Without these guidelines clearly stated, or automatically managed within the title's design itself, memory storage dilemmas will inevitably be incurred.
 +
 +
Developing efficient memory usage titles for Pippin is critical to the ultimate success of the title on the Pippin. Titles continually running into memory barriers obviously are going to take a big hit with popularity ratings as well.
    
==Pippin Authentication==
 
==Pippin Authentication==
 +
===Introduction===
 
In order for Pippin CD-ROMs to run on a Pippin Power Player, they must first go through a Pippin authentication process. The authentication process is about applying an Apple-approved RSA signature, in the form of an electronic encrypted key, onto a Pippin CD-ROM.
 
In order for Pippin CD-ROMs to run on a Pippin Power Player, they must first go through a Pippin authentication process. The authentication process is about applying an Apple-approved RSA signature, in the form of an electronic encrypted key, onto a Pippin CD-ROM.
 +
 +
===RSA's Authentication Software Library===
 +
Apple has licensed RSA for their public key authentication software library. The foundation of this library is non-reversible (i.e., one-way) mathematical algorithms based on using large prime numbers as keys to encrypt messages. With RSA's public key authentication system, keys are generated in pairs. One key is held privately by its owner, and the other key, the public key, is given out to be used by others to decrypt the owner's generated "keyed" messages. Public keys cannot be interchanged or swapped, and a message encrypted with a private key can only be decrypted with its corresponding matching public key.
 +
 +
Encrypted messages make very good electronic signatures since they can only be decrypted by a public key which is registered to a specific person (or company). Knowing a person's public key, however, will never offer any clue as to what that person's private key might be. Since only private keys can create an encrypted message, the system is secure.
 +
 +
===Authenticating a Pippin CD===
 +
For Pippin, the "message" to be encrypted is the entire contents of the CD. Since this typically is a lot of data, and the algorithms are slow, the CD contents are first "digested" by a hashing algorithm which produces a small digest of the CD contents. The digest later can be used to test that the current CD content matches what it was when the digest was first created and than signed (encrypted).
 +
 +
To create a Pippin-authentic CD requires two sets of key pairs. Each authorized CD stamping house has a public pair and private pair. Apple also holds both a public pair and private pair. Apple's private key is on a computer locked inside a safe which is connected to an internet mail system. Apple's public key is inside every Pippin ROM. The stamping house's private key is inside a "digesting" program at the stamping house and their public key is on file with Apple inside the safe.
 +
 +
The authentication process steps are as follows:
 +
 +
1. An authorized CD stamping house digests the CD content, then signs the digest (on the CD) by encrypting it with their private key.
 +
 +
2. The stamping house then emails the signed digest encrypted with their private key to Apple's computer in the safe.
 +
 +
3. Apple's "safe" computer unsigns the digest using the stamping house's public key, and then re-signs it using Apple's private key.
 +
 +
4. The digest, which has now been effectively signed by Apple's private key, is then e-mailed back to the stamping house.
 +
 +
5. Back at the stamping house, a program is run to apply the signed authentic digest onto the CD.
 +
 +
Figure 1 illustrates the flow of the Pippin authentication process.
 +
 +
Figure 1 : The Pippin Authentication process
 +
 +
[[File:Figure1111.gif]]
 +
 +
Through this process, private keys never have to be revealed to anyone and the only data which leaves the owner's facility, via e-mail, is encrypted with a private key.
 +
 +
After the stamping house applies the signed authentic digest to the CD, the CD is Pippin-authentic. During the boot process, the Pippin ROM creates a temporary digest using the same algorithm as was used to make the original, then unsigns the digest on the CD to compare the two. Only an exact match will allow the boot process to continue.
 +
 +
Note: Pippin disks are not exactly encrypted since they still will mount on a Macintosh just fine. However, the still have a signature applied to them which can be read and tested.
    
==Applejack Input Device Driver==
 
==Applejack Input Device Driver==
The Applejack input device driver combines the features of a game-player pad and a mouse or trackball in a small handheld device. Generally, Applejack input devices are attached to a Pippin Power Player (a CD-ROM multimedia player device derived from the PowerPC Macintosh).
+
===Introduction===
 +
The Pippin input device, Applejack, is a custom ADB device containing trackball information and a series of 18 button states. The Applejack driver resides in the Pippin ROM and loads at system boot time. On a Macintosh, the Applejack driver resides in the system extension file.
 +
 
 +
The Applejack driver uses a 'pipp' button mapping resource which allows any Applejack button to be mapped with either a mouse button or keyboard key function. The trackball data, however, is always treated as a "mouse" and there is no provision for remapping it.
 +
 
 +
While provision for default button mapping is provided, applications can also include a custom 'pipp' resource for setting button functions. On Pippin ROMs, a custom 'pipp' resource would be loaded automatically when an application is launched. For applications that do not use mouse or keyboard mappings (not highly recommended), the Applejack raw data is directly readable from the driver.
 +
 
 +
===Setting Up===
 +
The Applejack Software Developer's Kit diskette contains the application for editing the 'pipp' mapping resource, and an system extension file.
 +
 
 +
# From the SDK diskette, copy the application file to your Macintosh hard drive.
 +
# Drag-and-drop the system extension file to the "Extensions" folder in your System Folder.
 +
# Ensure that the Applejack input device driver(s) are plugged into the ADB jack adapter(s) on the backside of your Macintosh.
 +
# Restart the Macintosh to initialize the system extension file.
 +
 
 +
You are now ready to customize the Applejack input device driver.
 +
 
 +
===Customizing the Applejack===
 +
There are two ways to customize the 'pipp' mapping resource of the Applejack input device driver(s).
 +
 
 +
The simplest way involves using the application as an interface for redefining device button mapping. This mechanism is as simple as aligning an attached Applejack device (or possibly, unattached Applejack device, as the case may be) with a visual device on the Macintosh screen. By clicking on the on-screen buttons, a developer customizes an Applejack device(s).
 +
 
 +
The second way involves modifying the 'pipp' mapping resource code files manually, specifically defining how the button mechanisms on the device(s) should work.
 +
 
 +
====The Applejack Control 2.2.0 Application====
 +
The application is the interface used for editing the 'pipp' mapping resource. Double-click on the application icon and a window similar to Figure 1 will appear.
 +
 
 +
Figure 1 : Applejack Control 2.2.0 Application Launch Window
 +
 
 +
[[File:Figurea1.gif]]
 +
 
 +
If the application does not find any Applejack device(s) physically connected to the bus, the window displays a "NO GAME PADS FOUND" message across the window instead, as follows.
 +
 
 +
Figure 2 : NO GAME PAD FOUND Window
 +
 
 +
[[File:Figurea2.gif]]
 +
 
 +
Regardless of whether an Applejack device(s) is connected or not, the button settings may be edited. By clicking on desired buttons, a developer can customize the Applejack device(s).
 +
 
 +
A dialog box similar to Figure 3 or Figure 4 appears, depending on the button clicked on.
 +
 
 +
Figure 3 : Applejack Control 2.2.0 Dialog Box--Customizing Keyboard Key Functions
 +
 
 +
[[File:Figurea3.gif]]
 +
 
 +
When defining specific keyboard keys, select the "Keyboard Key" option, and press the key desired, which will appear in the character fill-in box. Also, modifiers can be designated (click on appropriate box) with a specific keyboard key, if desired. Then, click on "Ok" to proceed.
 +
 
 +
When defining mouse button functions, click on the appropriate "mouse" functions, as desired, then click on "Ok" to proceed.
 +
 
 +
Figure 4 : Applejack Control 2.2.0 Dialog Box--Customizing Mouse Button Functions
 +
 
 +
[[File:Figurea4.gif]]
 +
 
 +
By clicking "Ok" after defining each button, the Applejack driver's local data is updated. If an Applejack device is attached, the newly defined button functions can be tested immediately with the newly "customized" Applejack device(s).
 +
 
 +
By quitting the application, the 'pipp' resource within the system extension file is updated. If you would like to write the 'pipp' resource into a separate file, use the "File:Make Resource..." menu item.
 +
 
 +
=====Applejack Default Button Settings=====
 +
The Driver in the Pippin ROM creates default settings for the Applejack buttons if there is no Applejack extension installed. The default Applejack button settings are as follows:
 +
 
 +
[[File:Sect2.gif]]
 +
 
 +
====Modifying the 'pipp' Button Mapping Resource====
 +
Alternatively, 'pipp' resources can be built and keys (functions) remapped by looking at the driver's global data. Figure 5 illustrates the Applejack Input Device Driver and its corresponding button mapping.
 +
 
 +
Figure 5 : Applejack Input Device--Button Mapping
 +
 
 +
[[File:Figure55.gif]]
 +
 
 +
The 'pipp' resource is identical to the driver's global data and is a structure of type AJGlobalData. This global data is pointed to by the .refCon field of the Cursor Device Manager record for each Applejack device, as defined in the following code.
 +
<pre>
 +
typedef struct SwitchData {
 +
Byte    function;
 +
Byte    modifiers;
 +
Byte    keyCode;
 +
Byte    charCode;
 +
} SwitchData, *SwitchDataPtr;
 +
 
 +
typedef struct AJGlobalData {
 +
long    signature;
 +
Byte    MyTalkR0;
 +
Byte    handlerID;
 +
Byte    ourMBState;
 +
Byte    ourLockState;
 +
long    switchStates;
 +
SwitchData      switchMappingArray[18];
 +
long    nextjADBProc;
 +
long    cursorHandler;
 +
} AJGlobalData, *AJGlobalDataPtr;
 +
</pre>
 +
Most notably in the above code is the signature. The driver installer has initialized the signature to equal 'pipp' so that applications can look through the ADB device table and find this structure. Further, the function field of the SwitchData switchMappingArray is defined as follows:
 +
<pre>
 +
enum {
 +
 
 +
kNothing = 0,    // maps to nothing
 +
kMouse  = 1,    // maps to standard mouse button operation
 +
kMouseDblClick = 2,    // maps to mouse button double click
 +
kMouseLock = 3,    // toggles the mouse button state
 +
kKeyboard = 4,    // maps to a keyboard key
 +
kFrontPanel = 5,    // not used
 +
kModifier = 6    // maps to a modifier key
 +
};
 +
</pre>
 +
Each element of the switchMappingArray array represents one of the switches on Applejack. The array index is equal to the bit numbers, as shown in Figure 6.
 +
 
 +
Figure 6 : ADB Register 0 Four-Byte Packet and Bit Number to Button Mapping
 +
 
 +
[[File:Figure66.gif]]
 +
 
 +
If a button is mapped as kKeyboard, then the Applejack driver posts a keyDown event with the .keyCode, .keyChar and .modifiers fields in the event record.
 +
 
 +
The following code shows an enumeration of equates for the .modifiers field.
 +
<pre>
 +
enum {
 +
kCommandBit = 0,
 +
kShiftBit = 1,
 +
kCapsLockBit = 2,
 +
kOptionBit = 3,
 +
kControlBit = 4
 +
};
 +
</pre>
 +
If a button is mapped as kModifier, then the Applejack driver sets the keyMap global for the keyCode specified in the .keyCode field. The other fields are ignored in this case.
 +
 
 +
The following code is another enumeration of equates for the .modifiers field.
 +
<pre>
 +
enum {
 +
kCommandKey    = 0x37,
 +
kShiftKey      = 0x38,
 +
kCapsLockKey    = 0x39,
 +
kOptionKey      = 0x3A,
 +
kControlKey    = 0x36
 +
};
 +
</pre>
 +
To change the mapping of a button, map a pointer to the AJGlobalData structure, then put in new values for the .switches fields for the desired switch. A good reason to do this would be if you wanted to read the Applejack raw data but did not want a button to also be generating system events.
 +
 
 +
The following code maps a pointer to the AJGlobalData structure for each connected Applejack, and then changes the selected switch.
 +
<pre>
 +
void ChangeSwitchMapping (short whichSwitch, short function, short modifiers,
 +
short keyCode, short charCode);
 +
 
 +
void ChangeSwitchMapping (short whichSwitch, short function, short modifiers,
 +
short keyCode, short charCode);
 +
{
 +
ADBAddress address;
 +
ADBDataBlock dataBlock;
 +
AJGlobalDataPtr myAJ;
 +
CursorDevicePtr myCrsrDev;
 +
short       index,i;
 +
 
 +
//We need to copy these changes into the currently installed drivers.
 +
//Where are the Applejacks?
 +
 
 +
//The Applejack driver uses the .refcon field of the cursor device record to
 +
//store a pointer to its globals, a AJGlobalDataPtr.
 +
 
 +
if(whichSwitch>=0 && whichSwitch<=17)
 +
{ // where are the AppleJacks?
 +
index = CountADBs();
 +
while(index>0)
 +
{
 +
address=GetIndADB(&dataBlock,index);
 +
if((dataBlock.origADBAddr)==kDevAddr)
 +
{ // make sure that this is really us
 +
if(dataBlock.dbDataAreaAddr)
 +
{
 +
myCrsrDev=(CursorDevicePtr)dataBlock.dbDataAreaAddr;
 +
if(myCrsrDev)
 +
{
 +
myAJ=(AJGlobalDataPtr)myCrsrDev->refCon;
 +
if(myAJ->signature=='pipp')
 +
{      // got it.
 +
myAJ->switchMappingArray.function[whichSwitch]=function;
 +
myAJ->switchMappingArray.modifiers[whichSwitch]=modifiers;
 +
myAJ->switchMappingArray.keyCode[whichSwitch]=keyCode;
 +
myAJ->switchMappingArray.charCode[whichSwitch]=charCode;
 +
}
 +
}
 +
}
 +
}
 +
index--;
 +
}
 +
</pre>
 +
Some other ways to use this function could be as follows:
 +
 
 +
* Map the yellow button (S10, bit 9) to do nothing:
 +
ChangeSwitchMapping(9,kNothing,0,0,0);
 +
* Map the red button (S8, bit 14) to be equal to command-Q (quit):
 +
ChangeSwitchMapping(14,kKeyboard,((1<<kCommandBit)),0x0C,'Q');
 +
* Map the green button (S7, bit 15) to be equal to the shift key:
 +
ChangeSwitchMapping(15,kModifier,0,kShiftKey,0);
 +
 
 +
===Reading Raw Applejack Data===
 +
To read raw Applejack data yourself, use code like the previous sample code, and ensure that you map a pointer to the AJGlobalData for each connected Applejack. You need to do this only once, but remember the pointer since it will not be moved or purged.
 +
 
 +
Then, examine myAJ->switchStates to read the state of a button. Each button correlates with a bit in switchStates. The bit number is the same as defined in the .switchMappingArray array index.
 +
 
 +
For example, suppose you want to know if the yellow button is pressed; the following statement might apply:
 +
<pre>
 +
if(!((myAJ>switchStates)&(1<<9))) // 0==DOWN
 +
{                                                      // 1==UP
 +
Do something useful here, yellow button is down...
 +
}
 +
</pre>
 +
Be sure to keep separate pointers for each Applejack found (maximum of 4) even if you only support a single player play. If the bit number returns a value of `0', then the button is pressed. If a value of `1' is returned, the button is not pressed. No other event loop is required.
    
==Pippin Video==
 
==Pippin Video==
This document contains PippinVideo.h and myPippinVideo.c. PippinVideo.h is a header file that contains enumerated constants and structures necessary to access functionality unique to the Pippin video architecture. myPippinVideo.c is sample code that illustrates features unique to the Pippin video architecture.  
+
This document contains PippinVideo.h and myPippinVideo.c. PippinVideo.h is a header file that contains enumerated constants and structures necessary to access functionality unique to the Pippin video architecture. myPippinVideo.c is sample code that illustrates features unique to the Pippin video architecture.
 +
 
 +
===PippinVideo.h===
 +
<pre>
 +
// =================================================================================
 +
//
 +
// PippinVideo.h
 +
//
 +
// Copyright 1995, Apple Computer
 +
//
 +
// send comments/bugs: [email protected]
 +
//
 +
// (change this to a real header)
 +
//
 +
// This file contains enumerated constants and structures necessary
 +
// to access functionality unique to the Pippin video architecture
 +
//
 +
// =================================================================================
 +
 
 +
enum {
 +
kSetProgressiveScan = 0, // Progressive Scan
 +
kSetInterlace, // Interlaced scan, no convolution
 +
kSetInterlaceConv, // Interlaced scan, Convolution, no scaling
 +
kSetInterlaceConvScale // Interlaced scan, convolution, and scaling
 +
};
 +
 
 +
#define cscSetScanMode 128 // Used to select a scan mode for the Taos driver
 +
#define cscGetScanMode 128
 +
 
 +
// structure for Requesting/Controlling Scan Mode information
 +
 
 +
typedef struct VDControlMode VDControlMode;
 +
 
 +
struct VDControlMode
 +
{
 +
UInt32 csModeSelect;
 +
Ptr csBaseAddressA;
 +
Ptr csBaseAddressB;
 +
};
 +
</pre>
 +
===myPippinVideo.c===
 +
<pre>
 +
//==================================================================================
 +
//
 +
// myPippinVideo.c
 +
//
 +
// send comments/bugs [email protected]
 +
//
 +
// v1.1 March 28, 1996
 +
//
 +
// (change this to a real header)
 +
//
 +
// Sample code illustrating features unique to the Pippin video architecture
 +
// Shows how to use driver calls to change video scan modes
 +
//
 +
//==================================================================================
 +
 
 +
 
 +
#include <stdio.h>
 +
#include <stdlib.h>
 +
#include <Memory.h>
 +
#include <Displays.h>
 +
#include <Video.h>
 +
#include "PippinVideo.h"
 +
 
 +
// Prototypes
 +
unsigned long GetUserInputData (void);
 +
void DoCurrentSettings(void);
 +
void DoSetScanMode(void);
 +
 
 +
// Globals
 +
OSErr err;
 +
short currentDepth;
 +
GDHandle myGDHandle;
 +
short videoDriverRefNum;
 +
short currentScanMode;
 +
DisplayIDType currentDisplayType;
 +
UInt32 currentBaseAddress = 0;
 +
short currentPage;
 +
 
 +
//==================================================================================
 +
//
 +
// main()
 +
//
 +
// Starting point for everything
 +
//
 +
//==================================================================================
 +
 
 +
 
 +
void main(void)
 +
{
 +
OSErr err;
 +
VDControlMode myControlModeStruct;
 +
VDDisplayConnectInfoRec myVDDisplayConnectInfoRec;
 +
VDSwitchInfoRec switchInfo;
 +
CntrlParam pBlock;
 +
short input = 1;
 +
MaxApplZone();
 +
 
 +
// ooo Need to check for Pippin Gestalt Selecter here
 +
 
 +
printf("\nThis demo illustrates special functionality of the Pippin video
 +
architecture\n");
 +
 
 +
printf("\n\tInsert explanation and other stuff here\n\n");
 +
 
 +
DoCurrentSettings();
 +
while ( input != 999 )
 +
{
 +
printf("\nPlease enter a selection:\n");
 +
printf("  1 = Set Scan Mode\n");
 +
// printf("  2 = Swap Video Pages\n");
 +
printf("  3 = Current Settings\n");
 +
printf("input (999 to exit)>");
 +
input = GetUserInputData();
 +
switch ( input )
 +
{
 +
case 1:
 +
DoSetScanMode();
 +
break;
 +
case 2:
 +
// DoSwapPages();
 +
break;
 +
case 3:
 +
DoCurrentSettings();
 +
break;
 +
case 999:
 +
break;
 +
default:
 +
printf("Invalid selection\n");
 +
break;
 +
}
 +
}
 +
printf("\nPress Command-Q to Quit . . .\n");
 +
}
 +
 
 +
//==================================================================================
 +
//
 +
// DoCurrentSettings()
 +
//
 +
// Gets Current Video Stuff by calling PBStatus repeatedly
 +
// cscGetScanMode
 +
// cscGetConnection
 +
// cscGetMode <-- with different pages
 +
//
 +
//==================================================================================
 +
 
 +
 
 +
void DoCurrentSettings(void)
 +
{
 +
OSErr err;
 +
VDControlMode myControlModeStruct;
 +
VDDisplayConnectInfoRec myVDDisplayConnectInfoRec;
 +
VDPageInfo myVDPageInfoRec;
 +
VDSwitchInfoRec switchInfo;
 +
CntrlParam pBlock;
 +
 
 +
printf("\n");
 +
printf("Scanning for driverRefNum: ");
 +
 
 +
// We get the First video device because we know there is only one device hooked
 +
// up to Pippin
 +
 
 +
myGDHandle = DMGetFirstScreenDevice(dmOnlyActiveDisplays);
 +
videoDriverRefNum = (*myGDHandle)->gdRefNum;
 +
printf("%i\n", videoDriverRefNum);
 +
printf("Current Scan Mode: ");
 +
pBlock.ioCompletion = nil;
 +
pBlock.ioCRefNum = videoDriverRefNum;
 +
pBlock.csCode = cscGetScanMode;
 +
 
 +
*(Ptr *)&pBlock.csParam[0] = (Ptr)&myControlModeStruct;
 +
err = PBStatus( (ParmBlkPtr)&pBlock, true );
 +
if ( err )
 +
printf("Unsupported Functionality, err = %i\n", err);
 +
else
 +
{
 +
currentScanMode = myControlModeStruct.csModeSelect;
 +
switch (myControlModeStruct.csModeSelect)
 +
{
 +
case kSetProgressiveScan:
 +
printf("kSetProgressiveScan\n");
 +
break;
 +
case kSetInterlace:
 +
printf("kSetInterlace\n");
 +
break;
 +
case kSetInterlaceConv:
 +
printf("kSetInterlaceConv\n");
 +
break;
 +
case kSetInterlaceConvScale:
 +
printf("kSetInterlaceConvScale\n");
 +
break;
 +
default:
 +
printf("Err -- unknown Scan Mode, %i\n",
 +
myControlModeStruct.csModeSelect );
 +
}
 +
}
 +
 +
printf("Current Display Type: ");
 +
pBlock.ioCRefNum = videoDriverRefNum;
 +
pBlock.csCode = cscGetConnection;
 +
*(Ptr *)&pBlock.csParam[0] = (Ptr)&myVDDisplayConnectInfoRec;
 +
err = PBStatus( (ParmBlkPtr)&pBlock, true );
 +
currentDisplayType = myVDDisplayConnectInfoRec.csDisplayType;
 +
 
 +
switch ( currentDisplayType )
 +
{
 +
case kVGAConnect:
 +
printf("kVGAConnect\n");
 +
break;
 +
case kNTSCConnect:
 +
printf("kNTSCConnect\n");
 +
break;
 +
case kPALConnect:
 +
printf("kPALConnect\n");
 +
break;
 +
default:
 +
printf(" -- something else (not VGA, NTSC, or PAL)\n");
 +
break;
 +
}
 +
 +
printf("Current Screen Depth: ");
 +
currentDepth = (*((*myGDHandle)->gdPMap))->pixelSize;
 +
printf("%i\n", currentDepth);
 +
printf("Page Info:\n");
 +
printf("  Current Page: ");
 +
pBlock.csCode = cscGetMode;
 +
*(Ptr *)&pBlock.csParam[0] = (Ptr)&myVDPageInfoRec;
 +
err = PBStatus( (ParmBlkPtr)&pBlock, true );
 +
currentPage = myVDPageInfoRec.csPage;
 +
printf("%i\n", currentPage);
 +
pBlock.csCode = cscGetBaseAddr;
 +
myVDPageInfoRec.csPage = 0
 +
*(Ptr *)&pBlock.csParam[0] = (Ptr)&myVDPageInfoRec;
 +
err = PBStatus( (ParmBlkPtr)&pBlock, true );
 +
printf("  Page: %i, Base Address: %X\n", myVDPageInfoRec.csPage,
 +
myVDPageInfoRec.csBaseAddr);
 +
 
 +
myVDPageInfoRec.csPage = 1;
 +
err = PBStatus( (ParmBlkPtr)&pBlock, true );
 +
printf("  Page: %i, Base Address: %X\n", myVDPageInfoRec.csPage,
 +
myVDPageInfoRec.csBaseAddr);
 +
printf("  Page Count: ");
 +
pBlock.csCode = cscGetPages;
 +
err = PBStatus( (ParmBlkPtr)&pBlock, true );
 +
printf("%i\n", myVDPageInfoRec.csPage);
 +
printf("\n");
 +
}
 +
 
 +
//==================================================================================
 +
//
 +
// DoSetScanMode()
 +
//
 +
// Request and set the scan mode;
 +
//
 +
//==================================================================================
 +
 
 +
 
 +
void DoSetScanMode(void)
 +
{
 +
short input = 1;
 +
CntrlParam pBlock;
 +
VDControlMode myControlModeStruct;
 +
 
 +
pBlock.ioCompletion = nil;
 +
pBlock.ioCRefNum = videoDriverRefNum;
 +
pBlock.csCode = cscSetScanMode;
 +
 
 +
*(Ptr *)&pBlock.csParam[0] = (Ptr)&myControlModeStruct;
 +
 
 +
while ( input != 999 )
 +
{
 +
printf("\nPlease enter a selection:\n");
 +
printf("  1 = Progressive Scan\n");
 +
printf("  2 = Interlace\n");
 +
printf("  3 = Interlace, Convolution\n");
 +
printf("  4 = Interlace, Convolution, Scaling\n");
 +
printf("input (999 to exit)>");
 +
input = GetUserInputData();
 +
 
 +
if ( input == 999 ) break;
 +
 
 +
if ( input == 1 )
 +
 
 +
{
 +
if ( currentDisplayType != kVGAConnect ) printf("err -- not in VGA
 +
mode\n");
 +
else
 +
{
 +
myControlModeStruct.csModeSelect = kSetProgressiveScan;
 +
err = PBControl( (ParmBlkPtr)&pBlock, true );
 +
}
 +
}
 +
else
 +
{
 +
if ( currentDisplayType == kVGAConnect ) printf("err -- not in NTSC/PAL
 +
mode\n");
 +
else
 +
{
 +
if (input == 2) myControlModeStruct.csModeSelect = kSetInterlace;
 +
else if (input == 3) myControlModeStruct.csModeSelect =
 +
kSetInterlaceConv;
 +
else if (input == 4) myControlModeStruct.csModeSelect =
 +
kSetInterlaceConvScale;
 +
err = PBControl( (ParmBlkPtr)&pBlock, true );
 +
}
 +
}
 +
if (err) printf("err in PBControl: %i", err);
 +
}
 +
}
 +
 
 +
 
 +
//==================================================================================
 +
//
 +
// GetUserInputData()
 +
//
 +
// Whats until the user inputs anything other than 0
 +
//
 +
//==================================================================================
 +
 
 +
 
 +
unsigned long GetUserInputData (void)
 +
{
 +
long tempLong = 0;
 +
do scanf ("%ld", &tempLong); while (tempLong == 0);
 +
return (tempLong);
 +
}
 +
</pre>
    
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