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'''Altix''' is the name used for a broad line of servers and supercomputers produced by Silicon Graphics (International) using Intel processors. It succeeded the [[MIPS architecture|MIPS]]/[[IRIX]]-based [[SGI Origin 3000|Origin 3000]] servers.
 
'''Altix''' is the name used for a broad line of servers and supercomputers produced by Silicon Graphics (International) using Intel processors. It succeeded the [[MIPS architecture|MIPS]]/[[IRIX]]-based [[SGI Origin 3000|Origin 3000]] servers.
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The line was first announced on January 7, 2003, with the '''Altix 3000''' series, based on Intel [[Itanium 2]] processors and SGI's [[NUMAlink]] processor interconnect.  At product introduction, the system supported up to 64 processors running Linux as a [[single system image]] and shipped with a Linux distribution called SGI Advanced Linux Environment, which was compatible with Red Hat Advanced Server.  By August 2003, many SGI Altix customers were running Linux on 128p and even 256p SGI Altix systems, but SGI officially announced 256-processor support within a single system image of Linux on March 10, 2004 using an 2.4-based kernel.  The SGI Advanced Linux Environment was eventually dropped after support using a standard, unmodified SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) distribution for SGI Altix was provided with SLES 8 and SLES 9.  Later, SGI Altix  512-processor systems were officially supported using unmodified, standard Linux distribution with the launch of SLES 9 SP1.  Besides full support of SGI Altix on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, a standard and unmodified Red Hat Enterprise Linux was also fully supported starting with SGI Altix 3700 Bx2 with  RHEL 4 and RHEL 5 with system processor limits defined by Red Hat for those releases.   
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The line was first announced on January 7, 2003, with the '''Altix 3000''' series, based on Intel [[Itanium 2]] processors and SGI's [[NUMAlink]] processor interconnect.  At product introduction, the system supported up to 64 processors running Linux as a single system image and shipped with a Linux distribution called SGI Advanced Linux Environment, which was compatible with Red Hat Advanced Server.  By August 2003, many SGI Altix customers were running Linux on 128p and even 256p SGI Altix systems, but SGI officially announced 256-processor support within a single system image of Linux on March 10, 2004 using an 2.4-based kernel.  The SGI Advanced Linux Environment was eventually dropped after support using a standard, unmodified SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) distribution for SGI Altix was provided with SLES 8 and SLES 9.  Later, SGI Altix  512-processor systems were officially supported using unmodified, standard Linux distribution with the launch of SLES 9 SP1.  Besides full support of SGI Altix on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, a standard and unmodified Red Hat Enterprise Linux was also fully supported starting with SGI Altix 3700 Bx2 with  RHEL 4 and RHEL 5 with system processor limits defined by Red Hat for those releases.   
    
On 14 November 2005, SGI introduced the '''Altix 4000''' series based on the Itanium 2. SGI later officially supported 1024-processors systems on an unmodified, standard Linux distribution with the launch of  SLES 10 in July 2006.  SGI Altix 4700 was also officially supported by Red Hat with  RHEL 4 and  RHEL 5—maximum processor limits were as defined by Red Hat for its RHEL releases.
 
On 14 November 2005, SGI introduced the '''Altix 4000''' series based on the Itanium 2. SGI later officially supported 1024-processors systems on an unmodified, standard Linux distribution with the launch of  SLES 10 in July 2006.  SGI Altix 4700 was also officially supported by Red Hat with  RHEL 4 and  RHEL 5—maximum processor limits were as defined by Red Hat for its RHEL releases.

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