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NIC is the abbreviation for ''Number In a Can''.  Dallas Semiconductor which today is part of Maxim Integrated Products chose this perhaps not very fortunate name to describe the iButton 1-wire devices used for hardware identification on [[SGI Origin]], [[SGI Octane]] and later systems. Most later "NICs" are not really metal cans, but small 6-pin SMD chips, usually DS2505 ones (the exceptions are MAC NICs on IP27 systems and IOC3 [[PCI]] and MENET [[XIO]] cards, which use DS1981U NICs and IP30 systems which use a DS2502).
 
NIC is the abbreviation for ''Number In a Can''.  Dallas Semiconductor which today is part of Maxim Integrated Products chose this perhaps not very fortunate name to describe the iButton 1-wire devices used for hardware identification on [[SGI Origin]], [[SGI Octane]] and later systems. Most later "NICs" are not really metal cans, but small 6-pin SMD chips, usually DS2505 ones (the exceptions are MAC NICs on IP27 systems and IOC3 [[PCI]] and MENET [[XIO]] cards, which use DS1981U NICs and IP30 systems which use a DS2502).
  

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