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3,186 bytes added ,  17:46, 10 July 2019
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4. If you queue 'hangs' for some reason, do a 'lpc restart YOUR_QUEUENAME'  
 
4. If you queue 'hangs' for some reason, do a 'lpc restart YOUR_QUEUENAME'  
 
(where YOUR_QUEUENAME is your name from 1.) as root in a shell.
 
(where YOUR_QUEUENAME is your name from 1.) as root in a shell.
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===Zip Drives and NeXT===
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The ZIP drive can do everything a normal drive can do: You can use the drive as a normal external removable disk drive. And for the adventurous, you can even build a bootable version of NEXTSTEP on a single ZIP disk and _boot_ from it!
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Yep, this ZIP drive'll even work with YOUR NeXT. They can be connected to just about any hardware running NEXTSTEP. This includes NeXT hardware, Intel-based hardware, Suns, Hewlett Packard machines, even the NeXT You Own. And forget about disktab and fstab entries - you won't need to add one!
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====SCSI Interfacing====
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Hooks right into your current SCSI bus, just like real hardware. ZIP drives have a pair of SCSI-1 interface ports. The ports on the rear of the unit are DB25F Macintosh-style SCSI connectors. To connect to your SCSI chain, you'll need either a DB-25 to Mini SCSI-II external cable (p/n DCA 2200, $25 from Mac Warehouse), or a standard Mac to Centronics external cable.
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You may set the ZIP drive to SCSI target id 5 or 6 only. Yes, you read that right - only 5 or 6. The selector switch on the back of the unit has only 2 positions; it's not a rotary or thumbwheel switch, so you have only these choices.
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Yet, it does have a nice feature - external switchable termination! (given that you might otherwise need a Macintosh SCSI terminator). Would that all drive cases offered this.
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====Reformatting a Zip Disk====
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<pre>
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Reformatting a ZIP disk is as easy as reformatting a floppy. If you can't do that, you can't do this.
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Select the drive and click on the Workspace -> Disk -> Initialize menu entry of the workspace. You'll have the option of reformatting to Macintosh or NEXTSTEP only; Currently, DOS-formatted ZIP disks work fine under NEXTSTEP 3.3 or later, but for some reason you're not allowed to reformat a NeXT-formatted ZIP disk for the DOS filesystem. [Quite frankly, that's a FEATURE, not a bug. :) ]
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So, what's a person to do? The following, of course! (Kindly contributed by Frederic Stark):
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Bring up a panel to insert the disk:
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% disk /dev/rsd?a (? = scsi controller #)
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Re-format the disk, brute-force style:
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% sdformat -i? -v -f (? = scsi controller #)
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Eject the disk:
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% disk -e /dev/rsd?a (? = scsi controller #)
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Re-insert the disk into the ZIP drive.
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Depending on your karma, you should now be able to
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reformat the disk as a NeXT disk.
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What's that? You can't reformat the ZIP disk that came with your Drive? It's write protected? Sure is! Why _do_ they do that? No one seems to know, but it'd sure make for a real good "Unsolved Mysteries"... :) Anyway, one way to use this disk is to hook your ZIP up to a Macintosh, run the "special" MAC ZIP software and change it. Don't have a Mac? Of course you don't! Timothy J. Luoma writes in to remind us that if you're running on Intel, you can always invoke Alexander Wilkie's ziptool utility to remove the write protection from that stubborn Zip with finesse. For you NeXT folks, you might try some 3rd-party formatters like sdformat, but keep in mind you might end up just having to chuck the disk in frustration! Before you do, though, try the sdformat procedure described above. We'd love to hear from you if you succeed!
 
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