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6,121 bytes added ,  17:56, 10 July 2019
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What's that? You can't reformat the ZIP disk that came with your Drive? It's write protected? Sure is! Why _do_ they do that? No one seems to know, but it'd sure make for a real good "Unsolved Mysteries"... :) Anyway, one way to use this disk is to hook your ZIP up to a Macintosh, run the "special" MAC ZIP software and change it. Don't have a Mac? Of course you don't! Timothy J. Luoma writes in to remind us that if you're running on Intel, you can always invoke Alexander Wilkie's ziptool utility to remove the write protection from that stubborn Zip with finesse. For you NeXT folks, you might try some 3rd-party formatters like sdformat, but keep in mind you might end up just having to chuck the disk in frustration! Before you do, though, try the sdformat procedure described above. We'd love to hear from you if you succeed!
 
What's that? You can't reformat the ZIP disk that came with your Drive? It's write protected? Sure is! Why _do_ they do that? No one seems to know, but it'd sure make for a real good "Unsolved Mysteries"... :) Anyway, one way to use this disk is to hook your ZIP up to a Macintosh, run the "special" MAC ZIP software and change it. Don't have a Mac? Of course you don't! Timothy J. Luoma writes in to remind us that if you're running on Intel, you can always invoke Alexander Wilkie's ziptool utility to remove the write protection from that stubborn Zip with finesse. For you NeXT folks, you might try some 3rd-party formatters like sdformat, but keep in mind you might end up just having to chuck the disk in frustration! Before you do, though, try the sdformat procedure described above. We'd love to hear from you if you succeed!
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====Building NeXTSTEP on a Zip Disk====
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The easiest way to build a bootable version of NEXTSTEP on a ZIP disk is to use BuildDisk.app in /NextAdmin. You can, of course, "roll your own." But check your state and local laws first.
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Load a ZIP boot-disk-to-be. Shove a sacrificial disk into your ZIP drive. NOT the disk that came free with your ZIP drive. You gotta buy a real one.
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Launch BuildDisk.app. Using /NextAdmin/BuildDisk.app is merely the simplest way to build your ZIP disk; other ways exist.
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Look for the "Hard Disk" moniker. The ZIP drive will show up as "Hard Disk." (You'll know you've selected the correct drive when BuildDisk shows "Removable disk, 96 MB".) Be careful. Screw this up and you'll be kissing some other unsuspecting drive good-bye.
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Install other software, but wisely! Be VERY careful when choosing extension packages to install! By default, you'll have only about 30MB free on the ZIP disk (so don't even _think_ about installing NEXTSTEP Developer! Or Webster). Seriously think about adding sdformat, SCSIInquirer, and maybe even ppp to the disk's contents. Chances are, you'll be booting standalone for some ungodly reason, and these are good friends to have with you in your time of need.
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Build the disk. Click the "Build" button. The build takes about 1/2 hour. Longer if it's your first time.
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====Booting NeXTSTEP from a Zip Disk====
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<pre>
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Disconnect your ethernet. Go ahead and disconnect your machine from the network until such time as you have configured your new boot environment to use it.
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    Arbitrary Rule #42: No other removable media drives may have a
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                        SCSI target id number lower than your ZIP
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        drive's target id number if you want to boot
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from your ZIP drive.
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    Note: The SCSI "target id number" is the id number which is selectable
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          on the back of the ZIP unit.
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Select SCSI target id 5. In light of the above, it would behoove you to set the ZIP drive to SCSI target id 5, and any CD-ROM drive you may have to SCSI target id 6. If this cannot be done, you must remove the offending CD-ROM drive from the SCSI chain (either disconnect it or power it off).
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If Arbitrary Rule #42 is violated, the NeXT's SCSI sensing firmware seems to have trouble locating the correct device, and the boot will fail immediately. On NeXT hardware, you will receive a "no SCSI device" message.
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Determine the ZIP drive's SCSI controller number. This is the drive's logical order number. For example, If your normal boot drive is SCSI target id 1, and you have an external drive at SCSI target id 4, and the ZIP drive is SCSI target id 5, then the ZIP drive's SCSI controller number would be 2 (it's the 3rd drive in SCSI logical order; count starting at 0).
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If, as in the example above, your ZIP drive's SCSI controller number is 2, enter the following command at the boot prompt:
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        NeXT> bsd(2,0,0)sdmach rootdev=sd2a rootrw=1
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In case you're looking for a slightly more canonical form of the command:
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        bsd(<>,0,0)sdmach rootdev=sd<> rootrw=1
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This has not been tried on Intel hardware (or the other platforms). You might try entering this command at the "boot:" prompt, and letting us know the results. Who knows - you may even get your name mentioned, in real print, right here on Radical's web page!
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Once the system has booted for the first time (this will take longer than you're used to), you'll be presented with a language selection panel. Choose the languages you'll be using, but don't choose too many - these can take up quite a lot of disk space when uncompressed and installed.
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The system will automatically log you in under the "me" account, as there is no password set on that account. This will become a pain in the keister when you begin to perform system tasks. So - set passwords for both root and me accounts! Double-click on /NextAdmin/UserManager.app. When the panel requesting the root password comes up, just click "Login", as there is no password yet. Click on UserManager -> User -> Open in the menu, and select the account to change. Change the passwords to something you'll remember. Write 'em down on the disk, or I can guarantee you you'll forget what they are! Log out, log back in as root, and you're ready to rock `n' roll!
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====Writing dumps to Zip Disk====
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You're not supposed to mention it in polite company. But I'm sure we've got you wondering. "If the NeXT is such hot stuff, can't I use it to write dumps to my Zip Drive? After all, my friend's Timex Sinclair can."
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Well, it turns out that you can try to use the Unix `dump' command, as in:
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# /etc/dump 0oOf 89 /My_Zip_Disk/MyBigDump.dump
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...to dump a disk to the Zip mounted at /My_Zip_Disk, logged in as root. So, why didn't we mention it before? Are we trying to hide something? Not really. Just that it doesn't work.
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When the first volume is full and it comes time to put the second Zip disk in, `dump' and the NeXT file system automounter both go after the worm. The NeXT file system automounter wins out; `dump' craps out.
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DUMP: The ENTIRE dump is aborted.
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But it's common knowledge that a dump can't be held back forever! So what's a bloke to do?
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Worry not! Don't panic! This is the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Iomega Zip after all! If we don't know it... we beg.
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To save the day, Aaron Rosenzweig writes in to remind us of Eirik Fuller's patch in the current `gnutar' that lets the automounter have its worm, and eat it too. To do a multi-volume backup of the disk mounted at /My_Big_Disk onto the Zip mounted at /My_Zip_Disk, just log in as root and let 'er rip:
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# gnutar -cvf /My_Zip_Disk/ZipBackup.tar -lL 89000 -mM /My_Big_Disk
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When the first Zip disk is full, gnutar waits for you to press RETURN when you're ready with the next disk. Simply eject the current Zip disk, shove the next one into the drive (labeled the same as the first one), and press RETURN.
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And to restore the backup, just log in as root and cd to where you want the backup to be restored:
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# gnutar -xvf /My_Zip_Disk/ZipBackup.tar -lL 89000 -mM --same-owner
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Check out `gnutar --help' for more detailed info.
 
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