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NIC is the abbreviation for ''Number In a Can''.  Dallas Semiconductor which today is part of Maxim Integrated Products chose this perhaps not very fortunate name to describe the iButton 1-wire devices used for hardware identification on [[SGI Origin]], [[SGI Octane]] and later systems. Most later "NICs" are not really metal cans, but small 6-pin SMD chips, usually DS2505 ones (the exceptions are MAC NICs on IP27 systems and IOC3 [[PCI]] and MENET [[XIO]] cards, which use DS1981U NICs and IP30 systems which use a DS2502).
 
NIC is the abbreviation for ''Number In a Can''.  Dallas Semiconductor which today is part of Maxim Integrated Products chose this perhaps not very fortunate name to describe the iButton 1-wire devices used for hardware identification on [[SGI Origin]], [[SGI Octane]] and later systems. Most later "NICs" are not really metal cans, but small 6-pin SMD chips, usually DS2505 ones (the exceptions are MAC NICs on IP27 systems and IOC3 [[PCI]] and MENET [[XIO]] cards, which use DS1981U NICs and IP30 systems which use a DS2502).
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These NICs aren't network boards, they're small SEPROMs that look like lithium batteries. They can be removed and swapped if you need to replace the part they're on or want to change your serial number for another reason.
 
These NICs aren't network boards, they're small SEPROMs that look like lithium batteries. They can be removed and swapped if you need to replace the part they're on or want to change your serial number for another reason.
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* Origin200 = NIC the MSC (system controller board, the part with the buttons on it under the 5.25" bays)
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* Origin200: NIC the MSC (system controller board, the part with the buttons on it under the 5.25" bays)
* Octane = NIC on the frontplane board.
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* [[SGI Octane]]: NIC on the frontplane board.
* Indigo2 8-pin DIP ROM on the serial/keyboard port riser board.
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* [[SGI Indigo2]]: 8-pin DIP ROM on the serial/keyboard port riser board.
* Indigo: on the backplane
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* [[SGI Indigo]]: on the backplane
 
* Personal IRIS: 8-pin DIP PROM on the board with the power and fault LEDs.
 
* Personal IRIS: 8-pin DIP PROM on the board with the power and fault LEDs.
* Indy: stored in the Dallas chip in a similar fashion to the Sun hostid. It is equal to the Ethernet MAC address listed on the back yellow/orange label if you need to reset it.
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* [[SGI Indy]]: stored in the Dallas chip in a similar fashion to the Sun hostid. It is equal to the Ethernet MAC address listed on the back yellow/orange label if you need to reset it.
 
* Onyx/CHALLENGE: The hostid/serial number is stored on the system controller in a Dallas chip. Can be reprogrammed using the PROM monitor
 
* Onyx/CHALLENGE: The hostid/serial number is stored on the system controller in a Dallas chip. Can be reprogrammed using the PROM monitor
 
* Fuel [[DS1742W-120]]
 
* Fuel [[DS1742W-120]]
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== See Also ==
 
== See Also ==
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* http://forums.nekochan.net/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=16259&
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* http://forums.nekochan.net/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=16723613&p=7325241&#p7325241
   
* http://doc.chipfind.ru/pdf/stmicroelectronics/24c04.pdf   
 
* http://doc.chipfind.ru/pdf/stmicroelectronics/24c04.pdf   
 
* http://www.dalsemi.com/ Dallas Semiconductor
 
* http://www.dalsemi.com/ Dallas Semiconductor

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